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Oral Health & Aging

There is a strong relationship between your oral health and your overall physical health. Though medicine and dentistry have operated in separate but parallel spheres for many years, today’s doctors and dentists know there is a strong link between the two and research offers proof. Older adults with poor health can lose teeth sooner; those with osteoporosis will have bone loss that affects the teeth and jaws. It is important to know that older adults need to continue to focus on prevention of cavities and prevention of gum disease.

Preventative maintenance is helping older adults keep their natural teeth much longer. It is important to help protect your teeth and gums against oral disease by:

  • Brushing and flossing real or replacement teeth twice daily
  • Using toothpaste containing fluoride
  • Eating a healthy diet and limiting sweets
  • Avoiding risk factors like alcohol and tobacco
  • Visiting a dentist at least every six months

Cavity prevention
The causes of tooth decay are the same for all ages. Decay happens when the bacteria in plaque feeds on the sugar in our diet.

Many older adults grew up without fluoride in the water, which means they are more likely to have decay around fillings. Decay of the tooth root is also common in older adults because when the gums recede this exposes the root surface which decays easier than harder tooth enamel.

Gum disease prevention
Gum disease (periodontal disease) often progresses at a slow pace, with no pain. As a result, it is very common in older adults. Gum disease is not just about your mouth— there is evidence linking gum disease to heart disease, respiratory disorders and strokes.

Along with preventive maintenance, make sure you look for warning signs and see your dentist immediately if you notice any of the following:

  • Bleeding gums while brushing, flossing or eating hard foods
  • Red, swollen or tender gums
  • Gums that are receding or pulling away from the teeth
  • Pus between your teeth and gums when the gums are pressed
  • Loose or separating teeth
  • Any change in the fit of your partial dentures
  • Any change in bite
  • Persistent bad taste or bad breath

Overview

Cavity prevention:

The causes of tooth decay are the same for all ages. Decay happens when the bacteria in plaque feeds on the sugar in our diet.

read more...

Gum disease prevention:

Gum disease (periodontal disease) often progresses at a slow pace, with no pain. As a result, it’s very common in older adults. Gum disease isn’t just about your mouth - there is evidence linking gum disease to heart disease, respiratory disorders and strokes.

read more...

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    Brushing is not only good for your teeth but will save your gums from diseases. We recommend brushing after every meal.